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Thread: Raw Food Diet

  1. #1

    Default Raw Food Diet

    I was hoping someone could point me in the right direction with feeding my puppy raw. I want to start off feeding him raw 2-3 times a week and was unsure on what and how much to feed him. I'm currently giving him raw chicken and beef scraps here and there. I also had a question on raw bones. Can he have raw bones like chicken legs or something? Today my boy is 12 weeks to give everyone a gauge.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    San Antonio TX
    Posts
    1,767

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    Chicken leg quarters, ground beef, turkey, lamb, venison, bison, deer, salmon, mackeral, catfish, organ meats (heart, kidney, liver, gizzards), veggies (optional will promote more gas then usual fair warning), berries (cranberries, rasberries, blueberries), apples, tomato (occasionally), kelp, garlic powder, yogurt (occasionally), Green Tripe, necks, oxtail, cheek meat, pork (occasionally) all of those things you can use and make a meal out of using any of the ingredients you choose or what works for your puppy

    I currently have my pups on a 2 meal setup
    1st- ground beef, mackeral/salmon chicken breast, blue berries, rasberries, cranberries and garlic powder all mixed together
    2nd- 2 leg quarters (bones included) and green tripe

    Bones you will get mixed feelings on...ive started all mine out on raw bones at 3mths small pieces but big enough to where they dont gulp it they have to chew it, my 3mth olds have all handled the bones fine with no choking at all but they must be raw uncooked, you can do bones at your own pace thats just mine...cooked bones will splinter and the shards are brittle if cooked and can get stuck....if they are raw they arent brittle and dont splinter. And all the food mentioned above dont cook any of it give it to them the way it is out of the wrapping, just cut it up and serve
    Last edited by Dre; 03-16-2010 at 04:18 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Kansas City, MO
    Posts
    1,015

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    Dre definitely has a nice "menu" for his dogs and you can see the difference too, Carvin also feeds some raw and anybody that has seen his dogs will testify to the fact that they are nice and thick with no fat, I feed some chicken livers raw every now and then as well as leg quarters raw in addition to their kibble. I think you get a lil less poop too with a raw diet, do your research and find what works best for you, best of luck.

  4. #4

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    Hi Titan AB, I feed the prey model diet. It includes 80% meat 10% bone, 5% liver and 5% other organs. Dogs are carnivores and cannot, cannot digest vegies. No grain, No need to suplement with anything else or add anything else. The meat bone and organ gives your dog all it needs. The 10% bone will depend on the dog it is just a starting place. If the dog has loose stoole add more bone. If he/she is constipated add less bone. In the end the dog will decide how much bone it needs. Just remember dogs are carnivores and should be fed that way. Here is a site where you can get a lot of help from. http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/rawfeeding/messages

    James

  5. #5
    Sgaris Guest

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    Hey Titan,

    Dre has some pretty good ideas and his dogs look great to boot. I supplement mine a couple of days a week with raw and they do well. Start off slow with ground beef or chicken necks and work up. The chicken marrow is not as rich than beef or pork and will be easier for them to digest.

    James-it is simply not true to say dogs can not digest veggies. Dogs need some sort of fiber in their diet. They use green veggies (green beans, broccli, spinach etc. things like cauoliflower, lettuece, tomatoes, are not easily digested and can cause gas) However, the greens should be fed in moderation and can be rotated with green tripe, kelp supplement etc. and a bulk of the diet should be meats (muscle, organ, tissue etc.) and bone. (it is important to be careful feeding young pups a high amount of bone in their diet. It has alot of excess calcium that can cause weird growth patterns. However, it is true that Dogs do not digest grains very well and most pass through them very quickly. However, Oatmeal and Barley have been found in numerous studies to be very beneficial. Things like Corn, Wheat, Soy, Gluetens and White rice are not. Brown rice is a little easier on them but is really only for bulk.

    There are alot of folks that have fed that prey model diet and switched because the dogs do things like eat stool, grasses etc. because they are not balanced....they need some sort of greens and fiber in their diet...whether you use kelp, alfalfa, green tripe etc. They need it. In the wild wolves get it from the stomachs of the animals they eat. The diet was ideally balanced for domesticated wolves, wolf hybrids and such (huskies, malamutes). JMO and based on research.

    They have also done several studies of gamey, higher prey drive dogs being fed these types of diets and it causing problems down the road. They have stories of dogs not getting enough in their diet and chasing down small pets, game etc. All of a sudden the little pup youve been feeding a rabbit a day is bigger and needs more...neighbors papillon looks like a smaller rabbit.
    Last edited by Sgaris; 03-16-2010 at 06:40 PM. Reason: Spelling Error/Addition

  6. #6

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    Myth: WOLVES INGEST THE STOMACH CONTENTS OF THEIR PREY.

    This claim is repeated over and over as evidence that wolves and therefore dogs are omnivores. However, this assumption is just that--an assumption. It is not supported by the evidence available to us, and is therefore false!

    Wolves do NOT eat the stomach contents of their prey. Only if the prey is small enough (like the size of a rabbit) will they eat the stomach contents, which just happen to get consumed along with the entire animal. Otherwise, wolves will shake out the stomach contents of their large herbivorous prey before sometimes eating the stomach wall. The following quotations are taken from L. David Mech's 2003 book Wolves: Behavior, Ecology, and Conservation. Mech (and the others who contributed to this book) is considered the world's leading wolf biologist, and this book is a compilation of 350 collective years of research, experiments, and careful field observations. These quotes are taken from chapter 4, The Wolf as a Carnivore.
    "Wolves usually tear into the body cavity of large prey and...consume the larger internal organs, such as lungs, heart, and liver. The large rumen [, which is one of the main stomach chambers in large ruminant herbivores,]...is usually punctured during removal and its contents spilled. The vegetation in the intestinal tract is of no interest to the wolves, but the stomach lining and intestinal wall are consumed, and their contents further strewn about the kill site." (pg.123, emphasis added)

    "To grow and maintain their own bodies, wolves need to ingest all the major parts of their herbivorous prey, except the plants in the digestive system." (pg.124, emphasis added).

    This next quote can be found on the Hunting and Meals page at Kerwood Wildlife Education Center.
    "The wolf's diet consists mostly of muscle meat and fatty tissue from various animals. Heart, lung, liver, and other internal organs are eaten. Bones are crushed to get at the marrow, and bone fragments are eaten as well. Even hair and skin are sometimes consumed. The only part consistently ignored is the stomach and its contents. Although some vegetable matter is taken separately, particularly berries, Canis lupus doesn't seem to digest them very well."

    From the mouths of the wolf experts themselves, who have observed countless numbers of kills: wolves do NOT eat the stomach contents of their large prey, and are carnivorous animals. Additionally, Neville Buck from the Howletts and Port Lympne Zoological Parks in Kent, England, notes that virtually no small carnivore (which includes varieties of cats, wolves, wild dogs) eat the intestinal contents of their large prey. The contents are spilled in the enclosures and are often rolled in by the animals, but very little is eaten (if any is eaten at all).

    James

  7. #7

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    Just remember dogs are carnivores. The scientific name of the wolf and domestic dog is (canis lupus). So the domestic dog should be fed the same. A wolf in the wild will never ever eat green beans, broccoli, kelp etc. Also the natural diet of meat,bone and organs offer enough fiber for the diet. Dogs eat there on stool for many different reasons such as boredom, to clean there living space and some eat it just becouse they like the way it taste. Good luck and do lots of research before starting the raw diet.

    James

  8. #8
    Sgaris Guest

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    Everyone has an opinonion and what I've done and seen has been tested by people feeding raw for longer than I've been alive. I could sit here and google things for an hour too and find quotes to discount what you said as well. If what your doing works for you and your happy with the way your dog looks than that is all that matters. I was simply giving another perspective and correcting the very broad statement you made regarding vegetation, do they need veggies? no, but they need the vitamins and minerals in them and to say they can not digest all veggies is simply not true....I'm not going on and on. Part of what you said was true and part was not....as long as what your doing makes you happy kudos!
    Last edited by Sgaris; 03-17-2010 at 06:38 AM. Reason: Spelling

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    outside birmingham,al
    Posts
    69

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    hey Titan,
    those pups got some taste of raw while there wee here, i feed my dogs, raw. I use puppy mix from Blue Ridge Beef. you can go to their web site to see if there is a dealer close to you. I also go to the deer processing place during deer season and get what they throw away, and freeze it. bones ,meat , Then feed them tripe. but don't feed them raw and dry at the same time they digest the two foods diferently. Sometimes the store will have lamb cuts for cheap. or country ribs, watch for sales and stock up. The pups got a tatse, I did not think everyone would be into feeding raw so , I did feed them puppy food. But they go nuts over the real stuff.

  10. #10

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    My page has a little info on feeding at top of my "feeding" page on my site, also what i feed on the bottom of page. There is so much out there as well as every body pretty much has there own idea of what to feed, good luck, http://poppabill.com

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